Academic Policies

For an exhaustive look at academic policies at App State, see the Bulletin, especially the Academic Regulations section. The Bulletin contains the official statement of all academic policies and should be considered the final word on any University policy. If you have questions about academic policies, contact the CASSH office for guidance. 

Academic Policies

What does academic forgiveness mean? 

You can use one of the two forgiveness policy options to return to App State after being academically suspended. You don’t have to be suspended to use academic forgiveness—it is also useful for students who need to reset their cumulative GPA and/or major GPA and have a fresh start but who haven’t been suspended. There is a One Year Forgiveness option and a Two Year Forgiveness option. To use the policy, you must apply for readmission after meeting the requirements for the forgiveness policy option that you are using (see below; see also the discussion of Readmission). 

What is the difference between the One Year and the Two Year Policies? 

The One Year option requires that you not be enrolled at Appalchian for one full calendar year. You must also take at least 30 new and transferable hours at another school while you are away. Your GPA Hours (sometimes called Quality Hours) and Quality Points at the other school must combine with your GPA Hours and Quality Points here to equal 2.0 in order for you to be allowed to return. 

The Two Year option requires that you be away for two full calendar years. You don’t have to take classes while you’re gone, but if you do, all credit at any other schools you attend must combine to be a 2.0 GPA or you can’t return. 

What happens when I return under forgiveness? 

You must apply for readmission, and the Registrar’s Office will verify that you meet the requirements to come back under forgiveness. After you return, the Registrar will reset your GPA to 0.0, and you will begin reestablishing your GPA and major GPA the first semester back. You will still have any credit hours you earned before forgiveness, but those courses just won’t count in your GPA or major GPA anymore. You must take 30 credit hours after returning under forgiveness, and some of those credit hours must be major courses so that you can reestablish both your major and overall GPAs. 

When is a good time to use forgiveness? 

Since you must complete 30 hours in residence at Appalachian after you return under a forgiveness policy, the best time to use it is when you still have that many or more credit hours left to complete to earn your degree. Otherwise, you will end up taking elective courses to meet the 30-hour requirement. Since the one-year policy requires that you take 30 credit hours at another school and then 30 credit hours when you return to Appalachian, the one-year policy works best for students who have 60 or fewer earned hours. 

What happens if my GPA falls below 2.0 after I return under forgiveness? 

If you did not use both of your semesters of probation before you left for the forgiveness period, then you can use them after returning. If you used them both before you left, then you would be suspended if your GPA dropped below 2.0 after you returned under forgiveness. You could still return to summer school to try to raise your GPA, but it’s a good idea to talk to an advisor about your plans to make sure it’s mathematically possible to raise your GPA in the summer sessions. Similarly, if you did not use all your drops or grade forgiveness course repeats before leaving for the forgiveness period, you can also use those after you return if needed. 

How many times can I use forgiveness? 

You can only use academic forgiveness once during your academic career at Appalachian. 

Can I use financial aid when I return under forgiveness? 

You might be eligible for financial aid when you return. Contact the Financial Aid office to discuss this with them. 

What else should I know about forgiveness? 

  • Forgiveness does not override specific grade requirements for classes or GPA requirements for programs or colleges. 
  • After you return under forgiveness, you must take at least 30 credit hours in residence at Appalachian. 
  • Your GPA will be reset within about two weeks of when you return under forgiveness. 
  • All of your previous attempted hours and transfer hours will continue to count in your financial aid eligibility. 

Updated January 2022

How many hours should I take each semester? 

Most advisors recommend 15-16 hours each semester. With careful planning, this means you should be able to graduate in four years unless you have to repeat courses. 

You must take at least 12 hours to be a full-time student, and the maximum you can take without special permission is 18 hours. In summer school, a full-time load is 6-7 hours.

Note that in some programs (like Veterinary Technology), fewer hours per semester may be recommended due to the course content or delivery method. Always talk to your advisor when deciding how many hours to take each semester. 

(See Overload Requests for more information about taking more than a full-time load.)

Updated January 2022


What does it mean to be in good academic standing? 

You must maintain a 2.0 (a C average) or higher GPA to be in good standing. If you fall below that, you’ll be placed on academic probation. 

Keep in mind that your major GPA must also be 2.0. Major GPA is calculated in the CASSH office and includes the courses on your major program of study. Some majors also include any course taken in the major department in the major GPA calculation (see your major program of study to find out which courses count in your major GPA).

If your overall GPA is low, there’s a good chance your major GPA is as well. If you have questions about your major GPA, please contact the CASSH office.

How do I know my academic standing? 

If you are on probation or suspended, you'll see the following notation on your records and DegreeWorks to indicate your academic status:

  • Academic Probation = First Probation Term (AP)
  • Continued Probation = Second Probation Term (CP)
  • Academic Suspension = Ineligible to return during fall or spring semesters (AS)
  • Academic Suspension—First Term = Ineligible to return during fall or spring semesters (AF)

How long can I be on academic probation? 

You can use two regular (fall or spring) probation semesters to raise your GPA to at least 2.0. You can also attend summer school which doesn’t count as a probation semester. If you don’t raise your GPA in that amount of time, you’ll be academically suspended. 

The exception to this is that if you make a 0.0 GPA in your first full-time semester (Academic Suspension—First Term), you’ll be automatically suspended without being able to use any probation semesters, although you can return during summer sessions or by using academic forgiveness. 

You should always be working with your major advisor and an advisor in the CASSH office as you work to regain good academic standing. 

While you are on probation, the Dean of your college or school can attach specific requirements to your enrollment such as attending special advising sessions, limiting the number of hours you take, mandating that you repeat certain courses, etc. 

How can I get help if I’m on academic probation? 

Start with your assigned advisor, but also consider working with an advisor in the CASSH office. Don’t be embarrassed to ask for help as you navigate your situation. It can get complicated, but advisors have a lot of experience working with students in academic difficulty. Advisors can help you with issues like study strategies and time management and they can also help you find on campus resources that can help you regain good standing. 

Updated January 2022

What causes a student to be academically suspended? 

You are put on academic probation when your GPA drops below 2.0. You have two regular (fall or spring) semesters to raise your GPA to at least 2.0. The semesters don’t have to be consecutive, so if it only takes one semester to regain good standing, you would still have a probation semester to use later if you need it. But if you use up both of your probation semesters and your GPA is still below 2.0, you would be suspended.

However, you can also be suspended if it’s your first full-time semester at App State and you make a 0.0 GPA. In that case, you would automatically be suspended without being allowed to use any probation semesters. 

Note that only coursework taken at App State is used to compute your GPA. Transfer courses are not included. 

When you are academically suspended, you can’t return to App State except in summer sessions or by using one of the forgiveness policies. (See also Academic Forgiveness and Forgiveness Policies)

Can I ever come back to App State if I’ve been suspended? 

Yes! There are several options for regaining good standing (2.0 or above GPA) so that you can return to the regular fall or spring semesters. 

  • Attending summer sessions at App State is one way, but you should always talk to an advisor in the CASSH office to make sure it’s mathematically possible to regain good standing in just one summer. 
  • Using the academic forgiveness policy is another option. Be sure to read the entry on this policy on this page and in the Bulletin. It’s a good idea to discuss using forgiveness with someone in the CASSH office to make sure it’s a good option for you.

Updated January 2022

What is the Drop/Add period? 

The Drop/Add period is the first five days of a fall/spring semester during which you can add classes or drop them without using career drops. The Drop/Add period for summer terms is shorter and is published on the Registrar’s Office website for each term.

What if I need to make a change to my schedule after the first five days of classes? 

Dropping

  • If you want to drop a course, you can use one of your four career drops to do so. 
  • You can drop the course through your Appalnet account unless the course is linked to another course. In that case, you would need to fill out the Drop/Add form to get help dropping the class unless it is a chemistry course (see next bullet). 
  • If you need to drop a chemistry lecture or lab that is linked with another course, follow the instructions on the Chemistry Department website
  • You can use a career drop until the drop deadline published on the Registrar’s website. (See also the section about Career Drops.)
  • To drop a course after you’ve used all your career drops, you need to have extenuating circumstances. (See Exceptions to the Drop Policy.)

Adding

  • If you need to add a course after the Drop/Add period, you will need to get the approval of the instructor and the chairperson of the department in which the class is offered.
  • You will need to submit a Drop/Add form to the CASSH office by email. Be sure to carefully read the instructions for submitting forms by email. Paper forms are no longer accepted. 

This process should be completed by the end of the first two weeks of classes. Any requests later than two weeks will need to be accompanied by a written explanation from the department chair describing the extenuating circumstances for the late add. Final approval lies with the Registrar's Office.

Note: Routine adjustments or changing your schedule to accommodate work are not valid reasons for a late drop or add. Changes for those reasons should be completed during the first five days of class.  

Updated January 2022

Why might I want to audit a course?

If you audit a course, you must attend regularly and pay to take it, but you won’t earn credit for the course. Auditing can be a good idea if you need to brush up on the content of the course but don’t need the credit hours, or if you don’t want to spend as much time on the course as you would if you were taking it for credit. Note that if you don’t attend regularly, the instructor can request that you be administratively withdrawn from the class. 

How do I change from taking a course for credit to taking it as an audit?

During the Drop/Add Period (the first five days of the term) you may change a course from credit to audit. Fill out the Request to Audit a Course form from the Registrar’s Office website. You must get the permission of the instructor to change from credit to audit. 

Updated January 2022

What are Career Drops? 

Career Drops are drops that you can use after the Drop/Add period is over and before the drop deadline in the ninth week of the semester. You are allowed four Career Drops during your entire career at App State, so use them wisely. If you have questions about whether you should use a Career Drop or not, talk to your major advisor or an advisor in the CASSH office

What are the rules for using Career Drops? 

Students may freely drop and add courses during the first five days of the fall and spring semesters (the Drop/Add period) without using any Career Drops. But, sometimes you need to drop a class after the first five days of class. You can use a Career Drop to drop a course from the sixth day of classes up until the deadline in the ninth week of the semester. In the summer terms, the drop deadline is the second day of classes. 

How do I know when the Career Drop deadline is? 

The drop deadline is always published on the academic calendar on the Registrar’s Office website. The drop deadline is also the last day to withdraw entirely from the semester without extenuating circumstances. (See Withdrawal for more information.)

How can I keep track of how many Career Drops I have used? 

You can see how many Career Drops you’ve used in your Appalnet account and also on DegreeWorks. 

What about dropping summer classes? 

Check the academic calendar for the deadline for dropping a class in a summer term. Dropping in summer does not use up one of your Career Drops. However, if you need to drop the only class you are in, that is technically a withdrawal from that term, and the process is different. (See Withdrawal for more information.)

Should I drop a class if I’m having trouble? 

Some things to consider if you want to drop a class: 

  • Will it put you below full-time status (12 hours)? If so, that could affect financial aid or your status in campus housing. Talk to those offices to find out if it’s an issue for you. 
  • Would tutoring help you complete the course with an adequate grade? It might help to talk this over with an advisor or someone in the Student Learning Center

If I decide to drop a class, how do I actually drop it? 

You can drop the course yourself through your Appalnet. Go to your Student tab, then Registration, then Add/Drop Classes. You can use the drop down menu next to the class to drop the course. Don’t forget to hit Submit! Log out and log back in to make sure the course was dropped from your schedule. 

The registration system won’t let you drop 

  • if you have used all your Career Drops 
  • if the drop deadline has passed
  • or if you are trying to drop the only or last class you are enrolled in for that term. 

Some athletes may also not be allowed to drop if it will put them below full-time status—in that case, consult your athletic advisor for help. 

What if it’s past the deadline and I really need to drop a class? 

Exceptions to this policy are rare and require extenuating circumstances as well as the approval of the instructor, the chairperson, and the Dean. (See the section about Exceptions to the Drop Policy.)

Updated January 2022

What is in the catalog? 

The catalog (also called the Bulletin) covers important information that you need to know as you navigate your career at App State: 

  • academic policies and regulations 
  • course descriptions
  • degree requirements
  • information about the University and each college
  • a list of all faculty

Why is my catalog year important? 

Because the knowledge in any field is constantly being updated, the faculty make changes to their degree requirements over time to ensure that App State graduates are ready to work in that field, as well as for other reasons. You don’t have to keep up with all the changes, however; you just need to keep track of the degree requirements published in your catalog year of the Bulletin

Important: note that policy changes and prerequisite changes do affect everyone regardless of catalog year. 

Can I change my catalog year? 

You can change your catalog year to any catalog year in which you were enrolled at App State, but we don’t recommend that you change your catalog year without talking to your major advisor and maybe even the CASSH office first because catalog changes can also affect your General Education and/or minor requirements as well as major requirements. 

Some good reasons to change your catalog year might include that 

  • you’ve been out of school for a long time and your old catalog is about to expire (see below).
  • you want to add a major or minor that wasn’t available in your original catalog year.

What does it mean if your catalog expires? 

The requirements in a Bulletin/catalog expire after ten years. You must graduate within that time frame or change to a newer catalog. 

Note that courses also expire after ten years. If you stay enrolled, you’ll be okay, but if you have a break in enrollment (i.e., take a fall or spring semester off or withdraw from a fall or spring semester), your old coursework will need to be reevaluated by the departments when you apply for readmission, and you risk losing some of your credits. 

Is there anything that is not dependent on catalog year? 

In general, most academic policies apply to everyone when they are updated—they are not catalog year specific. Prerequisites for courses sometimes change, and those rules apply to everyone too, even students on catalogs before the change was made. 

As a general rule, for the latest policy and course prerequisite information, consult the most recent catalog; for your particular degree requirements, consult your catalog year. 

How do I know what my catalog year is? 

Your catalog year is initially set at the year you first enrolled at App State, and it will stay that year unless you elect to change it. You can find out what your catalog year is by looking at your DegreeWorks worksheet. Look for the catalog year to the right on the black lines dividing the sections. You can also find your catalog year and term under your Student tab in Appalnet: look under Registration and then Registration Status. 

Updated January 2022

What’s the difference between Chancellor’s List and Dean’s List? 

The Chancellor’s List is the higher honor, recognizing full-time students who earn a grade point average of 3.85 or higher in any semester. You must carry 12 semester hours or more of graded work to be eligible during a semester. Only those courses earning credit toward graduation will be used in determining eligibility for honors.

The Dean’s List recognizes undergraduate students who have achieved high semester grade point averages. An undergraduate student who carries 12-14 hours of coursework and earns a grade point average of 3.45 or better is placed on the Dean’s list for that semester.  An undergraduate student who carries 15 semester hours or more of coursework and who earns a grade point average of 3.25 or better is placed on the Dean’s list for that semester. Only those courses earning credit toward graduation will be used in determining eligibility for honors.

The Chancellor’s and Dean’s Lists are published on the Registrar’s Office website each semester. 

Updated January 2022

What if I want to change my major to another major or add another major WITHIN the College of Arts and Sciences?

 You will need to complete a Change of Program request as long as you do not have a pending graduation application.

What if I want to change my major to another major or add another major OUTSIDE of the College of Arts and Sciences?

You would need to complete that College’s change of program process. Please reach out to the College directly as needed.

What if I want to add/drop a minor or certificate?

You will need to complete a Change of Program request as long as you do not have a pending graduation application.

What if I need to change my catalog year (see Catalog section for more information)?

You will need to complete a Change of Program request as long as you do not have a pending graduation application.

What if I need to make one of the above changes and I have applied for graduation?

You will need to email graduation@appstate.edu to request the change. Be sure to include your full name and Banner ID in your email.

Note that you must be in good academic standing with a cumulative 2.0 GPA to request a change of program. If your GPA is not a 2.0 or higher, please reach out to the CASSH office to discuss your request.

Does App State have an attendance policy? 

The University expects you to attend every class meeting. If you miss, no matter the reason, you are still responsible for all the work you may have missed. Faculty may require special work or tests to make up for absences. Check the syllabus for each of your classes so you know what the policies are for that class. (Search for "class attendance" in the Bulletin to see the general University policy.)

What if I need to miss class for a religious observance? 

Faculty are required to make reasonable accommodations for students who request permission to be absent for religious observance. 

What if I have a medical or family emergency?

If you are out of town and cannot return to class because of hospitalization, a death in the family, or for other extenuating circumstances, you or your parents may contact the Dean of Students Office at App State to let them know. Supporting documentation is required. The Dean of Students can then notify your instructors, but that does not guarantee that the absence will be excused. Note that it is your responsibility to contact your instructors about making up work. 

What if I have to miss class for a University-sponsored activity? 

It’s important to participate in University activities outside the classroom. If you need to miss class to do so, it is your responsibility to

  • notify your instructors of any absences;
  • complete any work you miss including any additional work that may be required by the instructor;
  • maintain satisfactory progress in the course;
  • attend regularly aside from the absences for the University-sponsored activity, and 
  • if you think you’ll need to miss more than 10% of the class meetings, discuss that with your instructor at the beginning of the semester—you may need to drop the course instead. 

What if I can’t get to class because of the weather? 

Weather and road conditions can vary a lot in the area. Faculty are encouraged to make reasonable accommodation for students who live farther away from campus and who may not be able to safely travel to class. Check your email for notifications from your instructors or the University about cancellations or delays. Be sure to let your instructors know if you don’t feel you can safely get to campus. 

How do I know what the attendance policy is for all my classes? 

You should receive a syllabus for each of your classes during the first week of class. The syllabus should outline the attendance policy and whether attendance is used in calculating your grade. Read it carefully! 

Can missing class affect my grade? 

Yes, if the instructor chooses to make attendance part of the grading criteria. If so, that policy must be stated in the syllabus for the course. 

Can I be dropped for not attending class? 

Yes, the instructor can drop you if you are registered for the course but don’t attend on the first day. If you must miss the first day, you should let your instructor know. If you are dropped, you can re-register for the course if there are open seats as long as the Drop/Add period has not ended. However, don’t assume you will be dropped for non-attendance; if you don’t want to take the class, you need to check your schedule during the Drop/Add period and drop it yourself if the instructor did not drop you. 

Updated January 2022

How do I know when I’m a sophomore/junior/senior?

Students are classified on the basis of hours earned, which includes credit that you transfer to App State. Classification is primarily for recordkeeping purposes. It mainly determines when you can register for classes and what campus housing you are eligible for; it does not affect continuance at App State. Here are the classifications: 

  • Freshman 0-29 semester hours
  • Sophomore 30-59 semester hours
  • Junior 60-89 semester hours
  • Senior 90 or more semester hours

The CASSH office will complete a senior check for you just before you reach 90 hours/senior classification unless you are unlikely to be able to finish your degree within the next two or three semesters. The senior check lets you know for sure what additional courses you need and how many free electives you need to graduate, as well as alerting you to any issues you might have with your GPA and/or major GPA. (See also Senior Checks.)

Updated January 2022

Why do some majors need a contract? 

Some majors and minors allow students to tailor a list of classes around a specific academic interest or field. If your major or minor requires an approved list of courses (i.e., concentration, focus area, contract, etc.) you must submit a signed, approved list of courses to the Dean’s Office so it can be reviewed and added to your DegreeWorks. 

How can I create and submit a contract?

Discuss your contract with an advisor in the department. The contract must be approved by the department chair and emailed by the chair to your records coordinator in the CASSH office as soon as it is completed and at least two semesters before graduation.

You can work with a designated advisor in your major department to create the contract, but the chairperson is responsible for making sure the contract is academically sound. 

Updated January 2022

When are course substitutions allowed? 

In a few cases, it may be appropriate for your major or minor/certificate department to substitute another class for one that is on your program of study, especially in cases where the course you need is no longer offered. If you and your advisor discuss a possible substitution, you’ll need to get the approval of the chair of your major or minor/certificate department to make it official. 

If you have a question about a substitution in your General Education, you would need to contact the General Education office in 1114 Anne Belk Hall. 

How do I get the substitution to show in my DegreeWorks?

If the appropriate office grants approval, the chair or the appropriate designee must email your records coordinator in the CASSH office so that the substitution can be documented and your DegreeWorks can be updated. 

Substitutions are fairly rare and should only be requested for good reason. Note: while chairs can approve substitutions, they cannot waive University requirements. For example, they cannot waive the number of hours required to earn the degree, or the number of hours required to meet residency requirements, etc. 

Updated January 2022

Can I earn credit for a course by taking an exam? 

Not all courses allow credit by examination (3530 Selected Topics, 3500 Independent Studies, and 4900 Internships, to name a few), but many do. If you wish to try to earn credit this way, you need to 

  • consult with the chair of the department in which the course is offered;
  • if the chair agrees, pay the fee of $50 to the Cashier’s Office and submit the original receipt to the department chair, and 
  • submit the Credit by Examination form to the department chair.

Note: the completed form along with the receipt must be submitted to the CASSH office by the department chairperson (not by the student receiving the credit). If you pass the exam, you will get credit for the course (but with no grade) and this will be noted on your transcript. If you don’t pass the exam, no notation is made. 

What are the limitations of this policy? 

  • You cannot use credit by exam to repeat a course or to finish a course you are currently taking. 
  • You must be in the process of earning your undergraduate degree or taking courses for teacher licensure in order to try to earn credit by examination. 
  • Credit by exam cannot be used to meet the University’s residency requirements for graduation. 

Updated January 2022

What is credit for life experience? 

In exceptional cases, you could be awarded credit for prior non-college-based learning if the credit sought is related to your degree program (i.e. general education, major, or licensure requirements). You must be admitted to the University and have declared a major before the assessment of life experience for credit can begin. 

How is credit for life experience evaluated? 

  • You need to meet with the Coordinator of Credit for Life Experience in the University College Academic Advising Office
  • That person will help you to define the areas or disciplines in which you might be eligible for credit. The actual assessment is conducted by a faculty member in the appropriate area. 
  • You must pay a $100 fee for each area of assessment (payable to the Student Accounts Office.)

What are the limitations on this policy? 

  • You have to be enrolled as a degree seeking student or be taking courses for teacher licensure. 
  • Credit for life experience cannot be used to repeat a course or to meet the University’s residency requirements for graduation. 

Updated January 2022

What is a designation? 

To make sure students take courses that give them broad exposure to a number of fields in General Education, you are required to complete one course from each of these designations: 

  • Fine Arts (FA)
  • Historical Studies (HS)
  • Literary Studies (LS)
  • Social Sciences (SS)

It is most efficient if you take these courses as part of the Liberal Studies or Integrative Learning Experience (the theme) sections of Gen Ed, but if you finish those areas and you’re still missing a designation, you can take any class with that designation to meet the requirement. 

Note: if your catalog year is between 2009-10 and 2014-15, your Gen Ed does not require a social sciences (SS) designation. You would have three Perspectives (themes) that you can take classes from in order to get the other designations; if you need to take classes outside the themes to get a designation, that’s okay—you’re just taking an extra class. 

Updated January 2022

What is the Drop/Add period? 

During the first five days of classes in the fall and spring semesters (the Drop/Add period), students can add and drop classes as needed without penalty. Try to finalize your schedule as early in the Drop/Add period as you can, and keep in mind that if you add a course on the fourth or fifth day, you’ve already missed several class meetings. Sometimes it is necessary to change your schedule late in the Drop/Add week, but be sure to contact the instructor as soon as you add the class to let them know you’ve joined the class and to find out what you need to do to catch up. 

If needed, you can drop up to four courses after the Drop/Add period by using a Career Drop. The deadline for using Career Drops is the ninth week of the semester; the specific date is always published on the academic calendar on the Registrar’s website. (See Career Drops for more information.)

What is the Drop/Add period during summer? 

In summer school, the Drop/Add period is the first two days of classes. If you need to drop a class after the summer Drop/Add period, consult the academic calendar for the deadline date. Drops in the summer do not count as Career Drops, but you must still adhere to the drop deadline.

If you need to drop the last class you are in, that is a complete withdrawal from that term, and you will need to get help doing that. Please read about withdrawals on the Registrar’s website. (See also Withdrawals on this page.)

Updated January 2022


What if sickness or military deployment interfere with my classes and I need to drop a class after the deadline or after I’ve used all my Career Drops? 

Exceptions to the drop policy are rarely approved. You must be able to document extenuating circumstances that keep you from being able to finish the course. 

The following are NOT considered extenuating circumstances: 

  • you are failing the course
  • you realize you don’t need the course for your major
  • you change your major
  • you don’t like the instructor
  • you are working too much to complete the coursework

The following are examples of extenuating circumstances: 

  • you have a death in your immediate family
  • you have a military deployment
  • you experience personal hardship

If any of these valid circumstances occur, remember that you must be able to document them to be considered for an exception. You can fill out the Request for an Exception to the Drop Policy on the Registrar’s website. This document along with your supporting materials should be submitted to casshforms@appstate.edu.

What if I have a medical issue that keeps me from completing a class? 

If you have medical issues or a hospitalization that keeps you from finishing a class, you would not fill out the above form on the Registrar’s website; instead, you would need to work with the M.S. Shook Student Health Service to request the drop(s). View their website for instructions about what to submit to make the request.  

What if I have a mental health issue that prevents me from completing a class? 

For mental health issues, dropping individual classes may not be the best option; instead, full withdrawal may be recommended. Visit the withdrawal information page on the Registrar’s website for more information about the process. The Counseling and Psychological Services website also has helpful information about psychological withdrawals. 

Updated January 2022

When does my coursework expire? 

Just like a catalog or Bulletin expires after ten years, so does coursework. If you leave App State for a long period of time and return to complete your degree you may face the issue of having some or all of your coursework expire. You would still have the earned hours to your credit, but expired courses cannot count in your major, minor, or Gen Ed without approval from those offices or departments. 

How do I ask for my old coursework to be approved? 

The CASSH office can work with you on this. Once you’ve applied for readmission, we can seek approval from the departments and the Gen Ed office. Some departments want to validate expired coursework on a case by case basis, while other departments have spelled out rules for which expired courses they will allow. You can view these guidelines on the CAS website. Keep in mind that these guidelines are reevaluated and updated from time to time. 

Updated January 2022

How can I appeal a final grade in a course? 

If you feel that you need to contest a final grade in a course, follow these steps:

  1. Try to resolve the issue with the instructor. 
  2. If you and the instructor do not reach an understanding, you must then fill out the grade appeal form and file your written appeal with the department chair within 14 days after you consult with the instructor. You must supply the chair with the course syllabus and with any materials related to the grade (exams, papers, etc.) and a list of any materials you cannot provide (unreturned tests, etc.) The chair will work with you and the instructor to reach a resolution. 
  3. If the chair cannot help you reach a resolution, the student can file a written appeal with the Grade Appeals Committee. Visit the Academic Affairs website for more information about this process. 

Updated January 2022

What is grade forgiveness?

Grade forgiveness is different from academic forgiveness/forgiveness policy because it is the policy that allows you to replace the grade in a single class, rather than resetting your GPA in all your classes which is what academic forgiveness does. 

How many times can I replace a grade? 

You are allowed four grade forgiveness repeats that can be used on four different classes. You cannot use grade forgiveness more than once to replace a grade on the same class. 

How does grade forgiveness work? 

Once you repeat the course, the Registrar’s Office will replace the first grade in the course with the second grade in your GPA calculation. The first grade will still appear on your transcript, but it won’t be used to calculate your GPA, so repeating a course can really help boost your GPA if you do well the second time. 

You can take a class more than twice if you have to in order to get the grade/credit you need. The first grade in the course would be excluded through grade forgiveness (as long as you haven’t previously used all your grade forgiveness repeats), but all the subsequent grades would be in your GPA

How do I make sure the first grade gets replaced? 

In most cases, you don’t need to do anything. The Registrar’s Office will automatically replace the first grade for the first four courses you repeat. However, some selected topics courses must have approval from the department chairperson in order for the first grade to be replaced. Contact the CASSH office for help if you encounter this situation. 

Sometimes you might NOT want the grade to be replaced—for example, if you’re repeating a one-hour lab, but you plan to use your repeat later to repeat a class with more hours. In that case, you need to tell the Registrar’s Office NOT to process the grade replacement by filling out the Grade Forgiveness Exception form. Note that you must submit this form by the end of the Drop/Add period of the term in which you repeat the class. 

What else do I need to know about this policy? 

  • Grade forgiveness only applies to courses you took at App State. 
  • You cannot take a course at another institution to replace a grade you earned at App State. 
  • You cannot earn credit hours for the same course twice. The credit hours are excluded when you repeat a course, whether you fill out the Grade Forgiveness Exception form or not. 
  • However, there are a few courses with different content from semester to semester that can be taken more than once for credit: LLC 2025 Literature in Translation is one example. Since the content changes, if you fail the class when the topic is Russian literature, you would not be able to repeat the course for grade forgiveness unless you take it when the same content is offered again. The Bulletin should tell you whether a course can be repeated again for credit; special topics courses work this way as well. 
  • If you repeat a class you previously passed and you fail it, you will lose the credit for the course that you had previously earned. This is true whether you fill out the Exception form or not and even if you have used all four of your grade forgiveness repeats. You cannot revert back to using the original grade you earned.
  • Contact the CASSH office if you aren’t sure whether repeating a course is a good idea for you or to find out how much repeating the course could help your GPA. 

Updated January 2022

How is my GPA calculated? 

Your cumulative GPA is determined by dividing the total number of quality points you earn by the  GPA hours for those classes. Quality points per semester hour are awarded as follows:

Grade

Quality Points

Grade

Quality Points

Grade

Quality Points

Grade

Quality Points

A

4.0

B

3.0

C

2.0

D

1.0

A-

3.7

B-

2.7

C-

1.7

D-

0.7

B+

3.3

C+

2.3

D+

1.3

F

0.0

Multiply the GPA hours by the quality points to determine the points awarded for a specific course. For example, a grade of B in a 3 hour course would earn 9 quality points. 

Note that your major GPA only includes courses in your major and must be calculated by the CASSH office. If you have questions about your major GPA, please contact CASSH. 

Updated January 2022

Talk to the instructor of the class in question if you need more information about a grade change. 

Updated January 2022


 Do I have to apply to graduate? 

Yes. You must formally apply for graduation through your Applanet account in the semester immediately prior to the semester in which you plan to complete all requirements. The deadline for applying is published each semester on the Registrar's Office website (usually in week 4 of a fall/spring semester). 

If the last class will be in  

students will apply for graduation   

and graduate in

Fall semester

the previous January

December

Spring semester

the previous September

May

Summer term

the previous January

August

The Registrar’s Office will email information about graduation and the application process to students who may be eligible to graduate based on the number of hours they have earned.  

What if I don’t want to walk in the commencement ceremony? 

Students must apply for graduation even if they choose not to participate in the commencement ceremony. If you do not apply, you will not have your degree awarded or receive a diploma. All requirements must be COMPLETE  in order to receive your diploma. If you do not wish to participate in the commencement ceremony, you can opt out when you complete your graduation application. 

How will I know if I’ve completed all my graduation requirements?

For most students, the CASSH office will email you a senior check outlining your remaining degree requirements which you should use as a registration planning guide for your last two to three semesters (see Senior Check for information). You should receive your senior check when you have about 85 earned hours, but if you have questions, contact the CASSH office

Once you’ve applied for graduation, your records coordinator in the CASSH office will be looking at your record over the next few months to see if you are on track to complete all your degree requirements and notify you by email accordingly. Here are the steps in that process: 

  1. Registration Review: after you apply for graduation, your records coordinator will briefly look over your registration to confirm that you are enrolled in the correct courses to complete all requirements. You’ll receive an email letting you know if you are missing graduation requirements and directing you to your senior check and DegreeWorks to find out what courses you still need. 
  2. Graduation Audit: this is the official review of your record by the CASSH Office to determine whether you are in progress for graduation or whether you still have shortages. If you are missing requirements, you will receive a shortage letter by email (be sure to open the attachment to see all the details). If you are in progress for graduation, your records coordinator will put a note in DegreeWorks confirming that you are in progress (you only receive an email if you are not in progress to graduate). 
  3. Graduation Checkout: this is the final step in the audit process to confirm that you have indeed completed all your requirements and graduated! You will only receive a notification if you have not met all the graduation requirements. If you have been cleared for graduation, a note will be added to your DegreeWorks, and you will receive your diploma about 12 weeks after commencement—it takes a long time because App State has to verify that you have graduated and then send your information to the vendor who prints the diplomas. 
  4. Final deadline for completing any graduation shortages: if you are missing requirements, you can still be approved for graduation after the end of the term by completing those requirements by a deadline. Usually, missing requirements are things like an incomplete grade that gets posted after you complete the work, or transcripts from courses you took abroad or at another school. There is a firm deadline to complete these tasks to be eligible for graduation in that term. You’ll be notified of the deadline by email. If you don’t meet the deadline, you would need to move your graduation application to a future term when you expect to have all the requirements met. You may do so by submitting an email request to move your application to graduation@appstate.edu.

What else should I know about this process? 

  • All degree requirements must be completed in order for you to receive your diploma. This includes incomplete coursework. A student cannot graduate with an incomplete course on their record even if the course is not needed for your degree.
  • If you need to change your major or minor after you have applied for graduation, email graduation@appstate.edu. Provide your full name, Banner ID, and the change you wish to make to your degree program. 
  • No diploma will be ordered without a graduation application, and no diploma or transcript will be released if the student has an unpaid account balance. There is a $15 diploma fee for each degree you earn. 
  • Diplomas are mailed to the address you provide on the graduation application approximately 12 weeks following the commencement ceremony. While the CASSH office verifies your graduation very soon after the end of the semester, it can take some time for the vendor who supplies your diploma to send it to you. If you need to update your address, email graduation@appstate.edu.  

Updated January 2022

When is graduation/commencement?

There are three graduation dates (May, August, December) each year, and there are two commencement ceremonies (May and December). Students who complete their requirements in the summer should participate in the May ceremony preceding the summer term if they want to walk in a ceremony. Students who finish requirements in December should walk in the December ceremony if they want to participate. 

You can walk in the appropriate ceremony even if you have not completed all your requirements, but you will not receive your diploma until the CASSH office has verified that you have completed all degree requirements. Walking in the ceremony does NOT equal graduation. 

Updated January 2022


At the beginning of each term the Registrar’s Office notifies eligible students of the required procedure to apply for graduation. Failure to apply means failure to graduate. The deadline for applying is listed in the email and on the Registrar's Office website. Students must meet the following requirements to qualify for graduation:

  • Minimum of 120–128 semester hours, depending on your catalog year (See DegreeWorks for precise number; additional hours may be needed to meet residency requirements listed below.)

    • At least 25% of all degree requirements must be from App State State University (30-32 hours)

    • At least 50 semester hours of credit must be from a senior (4-year) institution.

    • At least 18 semester hours of credit in the major must be from App State State University.

    • At least 9 semester hours of credit in the minor must be from App State State University.

  • All major, minor, and/or certificate specific requirements met

  • All General Education curriculum requirements met

    • No more than 6 hours of PE Activity can count toward graduation requirements

    • General Education 1.0 (for catalog years 2009-2010 through 2014-2015)

      • Each perspective must be met with courses from at least two different disciplines within one theme

      • There must be one 9 hour perspective and two 6 hour perspectives

    • General Education 2.0 (for catalog years 2015-2016 and later)

      • The Integrated Learning Experience must be met with courses from at least two different disciplines within one theme

      • The Liberal Studies Experience must be met with courses from at least three different disciplines

    • Junior Writing and Senior Capstone requirements met

    • All Designations met

  • All “I” (Incomplete) grades removed from transcript

  • A cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 (2.5 for Education majors on catalog years up to 2015-2016 and 2.7 for Education majors on catalog years 2016-2017 and beyond)

    • A major GPA of at least 2.0

    • A minor GPA of at least 2.0 (in some minors)

      • Some minors and certificates require higher GPAs

  • All accounts must be cleared (library, housing, financial aid, etc.)

Updated January 2022

What are Latin Honors? 

Your GPA at the end of the next-to-last semester at App State is used to determine if honor cords may be worn at commencement.

  • To graduate cum laude, you must graduate with a 3.45 GPA.
  • To graduate magna cum magna, you must graduate with a 3.65 GPA.
  • To graduate summa cum laude, you must graduate with a 3.85 GPA.

How can I graduate with Latin Honors? 

  • You must earn at least 48 hours in residence at App State.
  • Note that transfer work or work for which a grade is not awarded (like AP, CLEP, IB credit, credit by exam) does not count towards the 48 hours or the awarding of Latin Honors. 
  • If you returned to App State under one of the forgiveness policies, you are not eligible for Latin Honors. 

How are Latin Honors recognized? 

Candidates for Latin, University, College or Departmental Honors will be recognized during the commencement ceremony. Diplomas and transcripts will indicate Latin Honors earned after a student’s final GPA is determined.

Updated January 2022

What is an incomplete grade? 

An instructor can give you an Incomplete grade if you completed most of the work for a class but had an unavoidable circumstance that prevented you from completing all the coursework. It is entirely up to the instructor to give an incomplete grade, but it should only be used for good reason, not just because you missed a lot of class or didn’t turn in assignments. The incomplete will show on your final grade report as an I, but it won’t affect your GPA. 

How do I get my incomplete grade changed to a letter grade? 

First of all, do NOT enroll in the same class again or audit it. Instead, meet with your instructor to find out exactly what to do to complete all the work and receive a grade. If you do enroll in the incomplete class again, your incomplete will automatically turn to a grade of F.

How long do I have to finish the work for an incomplete? 

You have one regular semester (fall/spring) in which to complete the work for the incomplete class. Your instructor can set earlier deadlines, but they must not exceed one semester. If the grade is not changed to a letter grade by the instructor by the end of the allotted semester, you will automatically receive a grade of F which will impact your GPA. If you earn an incomplete in fall, you have until the end of spring semester to complete the work; if you earn an incomplete in spring, you have until the end of the fall semester to complete the work before the grade automatically becomes an F. Note that you cannot graduate with an incomplete grade on your record. 

Updated January 2022

What is the difference between independent and individual study? 

An Independent Study is a special course, not listed in the Bulletin, in which the student designs a project and then pursues it under the guidance of a faculty member who serves as a consultant for the student while they are working on the project. 

An Independent Study must be approved by the faculty member who will direct the student’s work, the chairperson, and the Dean's Office. Anyone wishing to pursue an Independent Study must be a candidate for a degree at App State or working toward teacher certification. 

Independent Study courses will be numbered 1500, 2500, 3500, 4500, 5500, 6500, depending on the level of the student and the availability of the course level within the department. 

For an Individual Study, the student makes a contractual agreement with the instructor of a regularly listed course to complete the course on a different time schedule or without attending class regularly. Anyone wishing to pursue an individual study must be a candidate for a degree at App State or working toward teacher certification. 

What are the guidelines for arranging independent study? 

If a faculty member agrees to supervise your Independent Study project, 

  1. you and the faculty member will complete the Independent Study form and Special Course form
  2. To initiate the process of filling out the forms, follow the instructions on the CAS forms page. Note that all forms are now handled electronically. Paper forms are no longer accepted. 
  3. If the department chairperson approves, the chair and the faculty member will decide how many credit hours to award when the project is completed, and they will indicate their approval to the CASSH office by email as described on the CAS Student Forms website. 
  4. Once approved, the CASSH office will submit the Special Course form to the Registrar's Office for registration. You should then be able to see the course on your list of enrolled classes. 

Keep these rules in mind: 

  • No more than 6 semester hours of Independent Study may be used in an undergraduate degree program and no more than 3 semester hours in a minor.
  • An undergraduate student may take no more than 4 semester hours of Independent Study in any one term.
  • A faculty member should direct no more than 6 hours of Independent Study in any one term.

Exceptions may be made by the department chairperson because of hardship or for some other extraordinary cause.

What are the guidelines for arranging Individual Study? 

  1. You should meet with the faculty member who you hope will supervise your Individual Study. 
  2. If the faculty member agrees to supervise your project, you will need to fill out the Special Course form and email it to the instructor and the department chair for evaluation. Be sure to follow the instructions on the CAS Student Forms page
  3. If the chair approves, they will email their approval to the CASSH office who will then send the form to the Registrar’s Office so that you can be registered for the course. 
  4. The faculty member will submit a grade for you at the end of the semester just as for any other class. 

What are the deadlines for arranging an Independent or Individual Study? 

All paperwork must be received and processed by the published add/drop deadline for the term. (see the Registrar’s Office website for deadlines)

Updated January 2022

Courses numbered below 1000 earn “institutional credit” only. These courses do not count for graduation but are computed in the student’s GPA (unless they are graded S/U) and count in attempted hours for satisfactory academic progress. The hours count toward full-time student eligibility but do not count toward hours required for graduation or for honors or for residency. 

Updated January 2022


How can I earn hours for instructional assistance? 

The Instructional Assistance program allows juniors and seniors to earn up to a maximum of three hours for participating in supervised instructional experiences in the classroom. You can do only one instructional assistance experience per semester, and you can only count a total of three hours towards graduation. To get started, talk to the chair of the department in which you would like to earn instructional assistance credit. 

What is the approval process? 

  1. The student will meet with the faculty who serves as the director of an Instructional Assistantship.
  2. If the faculty member agrees to supervise the Instructional Assistantship, the Instructional Assistance Contract form and Special Course form need to be completed. Note: make sure to follow the instructions for submitting forms on the CASSH forms page. Paper forms are no longer accepted! 
  3. If the department chairperson approves, she/he will indicate their approval by email to the CASSH office. Once approved, the Dean's Office will submit the Special Course form to the Registrar's Office for registration.

Updated January 2022

What if I need to take a semester off? 

There are a lot of reasons why you might need a break, and it is easy to take a semester or more off. Keep the following in mind as you decide whether to take time off from school.

  • Talk to your advisor about taking time off to make sure you are aware of campus resources that can help you make the best decision for your situation. 
  • If you do decide to take time off, you should let the University know of your intentions by filling out the Intent Not to Return form on the Registrar's Office website to let them know you will not be attending in a future semester. Once you have submitted the online form, your information is automatically forwarded to the Registrar's Office for processing, and any registered classes you have for that semester/term will be dropped. 
  • Keep in mind that withdrawing from the current term is different from taking a future semester off. If you take time off starting in the current semester, you will need to formally withdraw (see the section on Withdrawals). However, both withdrawing and taking a future semester off will require that you be readmitted to the University to enroll again (see below and the section on Readmission).

How do I return after taking a break? 

If you withdraw from or skip a fall or spring term, that is a break in enrollment and means that you will have to apply for readmission to return to App State. The readmission process is not too complicated, but it can take several days to complete, so pay careful attention to the posted deadlines. 

You must be advised as part of the readmission process. If you are in good academic standing, you can meet with your major advisor to complete this requirement. Your advisor must nofity the CASSH office that you have been advised for readmission. 

You should meet with an advisor in the CASSH office if 

  • your GPA is below 2.0, 
  • if you are seeking a second degree, 
  • if it has been more than ten years since you were enrolled at App State, or 
  • if you are changing your major to a different department in CAS or from another college to a CAS major. 

(See the sections on Withdrawals, Readmission, and Expired Coursework for more information.) 

Updated January 2022

Who can earn internship credit? 

You must be a degree seeking student or working towards teacher certification to register for an internship. 

How are internships graded? 

  • Academic credit is based on at least 40 hours of field placement per semester hour of credit, but departments and programs may have additional requirements.
  • Internships are graded S/U unless they are embedded in a course; in that case, check the syllabus for information about grading.
  • You must have a 2.0 GPA to participate in an internship experience. In some cases, you must also have a 2.0 major GPA—consult the course description in the Bulletin to determine prerequisites. 

How do I register for an internship?

You must be registered for an internship at the same time that you are doing the internship hours. Part of the reason for this is that the University requires professional liability insurance while you are enrolled in the internship course, so the dates of your involvement are very important. 

You should plan well in advance for your internship experience since it can take some time to complete the required paperwork. Contact the department or program who will be supervising your internship to find out what the process is for getting registered for internship credit. 

If the internship is international, contact the Office of International Education & Development

Typically it is your responsibility to find an internship opportunity, but your major department may have some good tips for doing so. The Career Development Center also has good information and resources. 

Note that internship credit is never granted retroactively. 

Updated January 2022

More than 93 undergraduate majors are available within the College of Arts and Sciences. The College awards the Bachelor of Arts (BA), the Bachelor of Science (BS), and the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice (BSCJ) degrees. Teacher licensure may be obtained in Biology, Chemistry, English, French and Francophone Studies, Geology, History, Mathematics, Physics, and Spanish.

Specific degree requirements may be found by reviewing the Bulletin.

Updated January 2022

Do I have to take the math placement test? 

You do not have to take the Math Placement Test if you 

  • earned a minimum of 550 on the SAT math test, or 
  • earned a minimum of 22 on the ACT math test, or 
  • completed your math core requirements with transfer work.

Otherwise, you must pass part I of the Math Placement Test or complete MAT 0010 (for students on catalogs prior to fall 2022) before taking any courses in math, computer science, the sciences, or statistics.

If you need to take MAT 1110 or higher, you must take the Calculus Readiness Exam section of the math placement test or take and pass MAT 1025 with a minimum grade of C- first.

Updated January 2022

Faculty are required to maintain office hours that provide students with reasonable opportunities to schedule necessary meetings. Check the syllabus for each of your classes to see when your instructors hold office hours.

Updated January 2022

What if I need to take more than 18 hours in a semester? 

A full-time student takes between 12 and 18 hours each fall/spring semester. Hours in excess of 18 are considered an overload for a reason—that is a lot of work! Students should think carefully about committing to that many hours in one semester. 

If you want to take more than 18 hours, you should fill out the Overload Request in your Appalnet. Look under "Registration" and then "Request Overload."

Whether you will be allowed to take an overload depends on your GPA as follows, although exceptional circumstances are also considered: 

  • To take 19 hours (8 hours in summer), cumulative GPA must be: 2.50
  • To take 20 hours (9 hours in summer), cumulative GPA must be: 3.00
  • To take 21 hours (10 hours in summer), cumulative GPA must be: 3.75
  • Overloads exceeding 21 hours (10 hours in summer) are not permitted.

Updated January 2022

Can I take a course with Pass/Fail grading? 

Yes, but with the following limitations: 

  • You must be at least a sophomore and in good academic standing.
  • You are only allowed to take one course per semester (up to 6 semesters) under the pass/fail grading system.
  • You should be aware that some graduate schools won’t accept “P” grades on transcripts. 
  • Note that only free electives may be taken pass/fail—no course in the major or minor, General Education, certificate, or foreign language requirements may be taken pass/fail.

Furthermore, the following rules apply to the pass/fail option:

  • A passing grade does not figure into the GPA, but a failing grade will be used in your GPA calculation.
  • A student who elects the pass/fail option may remove the pass/fail option during the first nine weeks of the term. Once the pass/fail option is selected in summer, it cannot be removed. 
  • If a course taken under the A-F grading system is repeated, it must be repeated under the A-F system.
  • Graduate students may not elect the pass/fail option. 

Updated January 2022

Is there a limit to the amount of PE courses I may apply to my degree?

Yes, no more than six (6) semester hours of PE activity courses may be counted towards meeting graduation requirements.


What is a program of study?

There is a program of study for every major and for each catalog year. It lists all the requirements you must meet in order to complete your degree and graduate. There are also programs of study for every minor and certificate, as well as the General Education curriculum. 

Why is catalog year important? 

You should follow the program of study for the year you entered the University unless you have a good reason to change it (discuss catalog year changes with your advisor first). The program of study can change from year to year, but you can follow the requirements on your catalog year until you graduate. Note that course prerequisite changes and some policy changes will apply to all catalog years. As a general rule, for your major requirements, consult the program of study for your catalog year, but for policy changes consult the newest version of the Bulletin

Catalogs expire after ten years; if your catalog year expires before you graduate you will need to change to a newer catalog which means some of your courses may no longer count towards your degree because the requirements have changed or because coursework also begins to expire after ten years. 

You are expected to meet all the requirements on your program of study; any substitutions require the approval in writing of the department chair. 

Where can I find my program of study? 

If your catalog year is 2017-2018 or earlier, you can find your program of study at programsofstudy.appstate.edu. If your catalog year is 2018-2019 or later, you can find your program of study in the Bulletin. This includes programs of study for majors, minors, and certificates. 

How can DegreeWorks be helpful?

DegreeWorks contains your program(s) of study in a digital format that is updated as you make progress. It is an important resource for students and advisors. The CASSH office also uses DegreeWorks when completing senior checks and graduation audits for each student. The CASSH office notifies students if they are lacking some requirements required for graduation, but it is also your responsibility to keep track of your own progress towards graduation. 

Updated January 2022

If I take time off from school, how do I return to App State? 

If you take time off or withdraw during a regular fall or spring semester (not summer), you have to apply for readmission to the University to enroll again. You can apply online through the Registrar’s website and pay the application fee. The process isn’t difficult, but it can take some time, so be sure to pay attention to the deadlines and don’t wait until the last minute. 

What are the deadlines to apply for readmission? 

The deadlines are posted on the Registrar’s website each semester. The application for a term is available months before the term starts, so you can get started on the process early. 

It says I have to be advised as part of the readmission process. How does that work? 

Among other readmission tasks, you do have to talk to an advisor to make sure you get back on track. If you can’t get in touch with your major advisor, you can contact an advisor in the CASSH office. If you do your advising with your major advisor, ask that advisor to leave clear notes in DegreeWorks or email the CASSH office to let us know that you’ve been advised. We can then officially let the Registrar’s Office know that your advising is complete. 

While we encourage you to talk to your major advisor, note that you must meet with an advisor in the CASSH office if 

  • your GPA is below 2.0, 
  • if you are seeking a second degree, 
  • if it has been more than ten years since you were enrolled at App State, or 
  • if you are changing your major to a different department in CAS or from another college to a CAS major. 

What if I want to change to a major in Arts and Sciences from another college or vice versa? 

If your GPA is above 2.0, you can change your major during the readmission process unless the major you want to do requires admission to that program first (like nursing or music, for example). 

  • If you want to change from a College of Arts and Sciences major to one in another college, contact that college office to find out how readmission advising works. 
  • If you want to change from another college to an Arts and Sciences major, contact the CASSH office for readmission advising. Your major can be officially changed as part of the readmission process. 

What else do I need to do for readmission? 

In your MyMountaineer Portal, you can fill out the application and see other tasks that you must complete prior to being readmitted. These can include sending transcripts if you went to another school, completing documentation to show your in-state residency, and other forms. 

Once you’ve completed the application process and been accepted, the Registrar’s Office will be in touch about when you can register. 

Updated January 2022

What is meant by residency requirements? 

Residency requirements refer to how many hours you complete in residence at App State. Classes that are “in residence” can include classes you take on campus or online through App State, and it can also include study abroad courses. 

What courses are NOT considered in residence? 

  • transfer credit, including UNC Online courses
  • credit by examination
  • credit for life experience
  • credit for military experience
  • credit taken while enrolled as a non-degree seeking student
  • institutional credit

How many hours do I have to take in residence at App State? 

There are several residency requirements that must be met for App State to grant you a degree: 

  • You have to complete at least 25% of the hours required for your degree at App State. For most majors, that’s 30 hours, but it can vary depending on your catalog year and how many hours are required in your major. 
  • At least 50 of your semester hours for your degree must be from a four-year institution. This rule mainly affects students who transfer in a lot of hours (70 or more) from a community college. If you transfer in more than 70 community college hours, you may have to take more hours at App State to meet the 50 hour requirement. 
  • At least 18 semester hours of your major requirements must be taken in residence at App State. 
  • At least 9 semester hours of your minor requirements must be taken in residence at App State. 

Updated January 2022

I got an academic probation warning. What does that mean?

The UNC system adopted a policy in 2014 that says that students must earn at least 67% of their total attempted hours to be considered to be making satisfactory academic progress (SAP). If you withdraw from or fail courses or repeat courses, you may get this warning since all those actions add to your attempted hours (see example below). You can get this warning even if your GPA is above 2.0. 

Does it mean I’m in trouble? 

It’s a warning to let you know that you aren’t proceeding towards graduation efficiently. However, being below 67% could affect your financial aid, so you should talk to the Financial Aid Office if you are concerned. With that said, if your GPA is below 2.0, you are on academic probation and that IS a serious cause for concern—talk to your advisor or someone in the CASSH office right away. 

Why is the terminology so confusing? 

Since the policy is a UNC system policy, this language is used state-wide.

You would be notified separately if you are actually on academic probation which can affect your ability to get financial aid and could lead to academic suspension if you do not raise your GPA to at least 2.0.

Can you give me an example of how the 67% is calculated? 

Yes. For example, if you passed 60 hours, failed 6 hours and repeated 12 hours, you would have 78 cumulative attempted credit hours (even though there would be only 60 earned hours). If you calculate 67% of 78, you will get 52.2. Rounding that up, the student would have to pass 53 of those 78 hours to have successfully completed 67% of them. Since the student in this example passed 60 hours, the student would meet this requirement.

What is an attempted hour? 

An attempted hour is any hour you are in after the Drop/Add period is over. This includes courses you drop after Drop/Add is over, repeated courses (both the initial hours and the retakes), withdrawals, medical course reductions, and developmental courses. So if you have a rough semester and have to withdraw or drop courses, that can lower your percentage of passed courses and cause you to get this warning, even if your GPA is great. Remember, it’s only a warning to let you know that you may be behind on your graduation plan. 

Updated January 2022

If I graduate from App State, can I return to earn a second undergrad degree? 

Yes. You will need to apply for readmission through the Registrar’s Office.

  • You must meet all the requirements for the second degree, but your General Education will be considered complete.
  • You don’t have to do a minor either if you are pursuing a degree in a different discipline than your first App State degree.
  • There is no minimum number of hours required.
  • You must apply for graduation when all your requirements are met to receive your second diploma. 

What if I didn’t attend App State for my first degree? 

You can apply through the Office of Admissions to come to App State to earn a second degree.

  • You will have a 90-hour block of credit hours transferred in as DEG CORE, and General Education is considered complete. 
  • At time of admission, your coursework may need to be reviewed for equivalency. You may reach out to the CASSH office for assistance. 
  • You must complete all catalog requirements for the second degree and a minimum of 120 (up to 128 for some majors, depending on catalog year) is required to graduate. 
  • If a minor is required as a part of the degree, students must earn a minor at Appstate.
  • You will need to apply for graduation when all requirements are met in order to be awarded a diploma.

What if it’s been a really long time since I finished my first degree? 

If your coursework is over ten years old, you will still be considered as having General Education and free electives completed, but courses for your major, minor (if required), and/or certificate would have to be evaluated to see if they can count towards the specific major requirements (see the discussion on Expired Coursework).

Updated January 2022

What is a senior check? 

A senior check is an audit of your progress towards graduation that is provided to all College of Arts and Sciences students by the CASSH office. Your senior check gives you the information you need to plan out your final semesters to make sure you are completing all your requirements and can graduate on time! 

When will I get my senior check? 

The CASSH office will do a senior check for most students just before they become seniors, at about 85 earned hours. If you have not made a lot of progress in your major yet, we may wait to do your senior check when you are closer to graduating. 

Your senior check will be emailed to you and a copy will be provided to your major department. Be sure to open the attachment in the email and read the senior check carefully. Please review this senior check with your departmental advisor at your next required advising appointment.

Note: If your major requires a contract and you have yet to submit that, we will be unable to do your senior check on schedule. If your major requires a contract, talk to your major advisor about the classes that should be included in the contract so your major department can officially submit that to the CASSH office.

What if I have questions about my senior check? 

Review your senior check with your major advisor, but if questions remain, contact the CASSH office to speak to your records coordinator. 

Updated January 2022

All baccalaureate degrees granted by App State require the completion of a minimum of 50 semester hours at a senior (four-year) college or university. (Note: Credit awarded for military service or life experience does not count as part of the required 50 hours.) See the section about Residency Requirements above for more information.

Updated January 2022

Can I take courses at another school at the same time I attend App State? 

You must request permission to enroll at another school while you are enrolled at App State. 

  • You can request permission from your Dean’s Office by filling out the Visiting Coursework request under your “Student” tab in Appalnet. 
  • You should request permission before taking any courses at another school even if you don’t attend both schools at the same time. 
  • Requesting permission helps you know whether the course will transfer or not and how it can count in your degree and keeps you from taking courses you don’t need. 
  • Students can find more information on the Transfer Admissions and Engagement website. (Also see the discussion about Taking Courses at Another School/Visiting Coursework.)

Updated January 2022

What is a special course form and where can I find it? 

The Special Course Form is used to help you register for courses that are not in the normal catalog or schedule such as: 

  • Research assistantships
  • Individual study
  • Honors thesis
  • Independent study*
  • Master’s thesis
  • Instructional assistantships*
  • Secondary teaching assistantships*
  • Other courses not in the normal course catalog

*Note that the courses with an asterisk also require an additional form to complete your registration. 

Special Course forms can be found on the CAS website. Note: Follow the directions below to correctly submit the form by email. Paper forms are no longer accepted. 

How do I submit a special course form? 

You must fill out the form completely. Be sure to include all the required information. Then, you must email the instructor of the course and copy the department chair and the CASSH office (casshforms@appstate.edu.) The instructor and the chairperson will need to reply all with their approval or denial of the request. Once the CASSH office receives all approvals, the form will be processed. 

Updated January 2022

When are substitutions or waivers appropriate? 

Sometimes there is a good reason to substitute a different course for a degree requirement (requirements have changed, a course is no longer offered, etc.) But in order for a sub or waiver to happen, the department chairperson or official designee must approve. That approval must be emailed to your records coordinator in the CASSH office so the sub or waiver can be documented and so the update can be made in DegreeWorks. 

Students who fail to meet all published degree requirements will not be approved for graduation by the Dean’s Office, so make sure you communicate clearly with your department and with the CASSH office to document any subs or waivers as early in your career at App State as possible. 

What cannot be subbed or waived?

Department chairs cannot waive University requirements like the total hours required to graduate or the requirement that a BA degree have a minor, etc. 

Udpated January 2022

Can I take courses at another school to meet requirements at App State? 

Yes. However, you must ask for approval from the Dean’s Office first. The approval process lets you know for sure whether the course will transfer and count in your degree. 

What is the process for requesting approval? 

You can request permission by filling out the Visiting Coursework request under your “Student” tab in Appalnet. If you don’t request approval before you take the course, the course may not be allowed to transfer.

What other rules do I need to know about? 

  • You must make a C or better at the other school in order for a course to transfer to App State. 
  • Courses at the 3000 level or above must be approved by the department chair BEFORE you request approval from the Dean’s Office. Failing to do so will slow down the approval process. 
  • You must meet the residency requirements at App State in order to graduate. See the section on Residency Requirements for more information. If you have already transferred too many credits, your request will likely be denied. 
  • We do not recommend that you take more than 18 hours combined at both schools, especially if your GPA is low. 
  • If your GPA is below 2.0, courses you take elsewhere will not be posted to your record until you regain good academic standing. 
  • While only grades of C or better will transfer, those grades are NOT used in computing your GPA at App State. Taking courses elsewhere is NOT a valid strategy for raising GPA at App State. Only courses taken here will affect GPA.

Updated January 2022

How do I withdraw from the semester? 

Sometimes students need to drop all their classes and leave the University for a period of time. Withdrawals are processed through the Registrar’s website, and you can find more complete information there. You would need to complete the “Withdraw from the University” form during the allowed withdrawal period (up until the ninth week of the semester.)

What is the deadline for withdrawal? 

You must fill out the form during the first nine weeks of classes in order to be allowed to withdraw without extenuating circumstances. The withdrawal deadline is the same as the deadline for using your Career Drops (ninth week of the semester—see the academic calendar for the exact date each semester.)

What if I really need to withdraw after the deadline? 

If you need to withdraw after the deadline, you must be able to document extenuating circumstances in order to be allowed to do so. You would submit a late withdrawal request for extenuating circumstances to the Registrar’s website. Note that health issues, military service, and personal hardship are considered valid reasons for a late withdrawal, but poor performance, missing deadlines, or legal issues are not. 

What happens after I withdraw? 

After your form is processed, you will be assigned grades of W for all your courses. W grades DO count in your attempted hours but will not affect your GPA. 

Are retroactive withdrawals possible? 

You can request a withdrawal after the end of the academic term; however, as with late withdrawals, you need to document valid extenuating circumstances in order for your request to be granted. 

How can I come back to App State after withdrawing? 

You will need to apply for readmission to return to App State. (See the information on Readmission in this section.) 

Updated January 2022